Selected Press Hits & Interviews

Op-ed: The Menopause-Alzheimer’s Connection

April 18, 2018  | By Lisa Mosconi, PhD

In the next three minutes, three people will develop Alzheimer’s disease. Two of them will be women. There are 5.7 million Alzheimer’s patients in the United States. By 2050, there will probably be as many as 14 million, and twice as many women as men will have the disease. And yet research into “women’s health” remains largely focused on reproductive fitness and breast cancer. We need to be paying much more attention to the most important aspect of any woman’s future: her ability to think, to recall, to imagine — her brain. Read my op-ed here.

Science, Health and Technology NTN24 show

Dr. Mosconi is interviewed on the "CST" Science, Health and Technology daily show on NTN24, the Latino for Latino News Channel broadcasting across all of the Americas. 

Mediterranean diet may slow development of Alzheimer’s disease

May 15, 2018  |  By Sharon Reynolds

A research team led by Dr. Lisa Mosconi from Weill Cornell Medicine found differences in brain imaging scans between people who reported eating a Mediterranean diet and those who ate a standard Western diet. The researchers estimate that there may be as much as a three-and-a-half-year delay in progression of Alzheimer’s disease in people who have eaten a Mediterranean diet for many years, rather than a standard Western diet. Research that involves larger and more diverse groups of people over longer periods of time is needed to confirm these findings. 

Mediterranean diet delays Alzheimer’s for three extra years

May 2, 2018  | By Alice Klein

Following a Mediterranean diet can help delay Alzheimer’s disease – and perhaps even prevent it altogether, brain imaging suggests. Population studies have found that people who eat a Mediterranean diet – mostly plants, fish and olive oil and limited red meat, sugar and processed food – tend to be less prone to Alzheimer’s disease. Brain imaging studies from Dr. Mosconi's team provide clues on what happens to your brain if you follow a Mediterranean vs. Western diet.

Brain Food: How Our Meals Are Shaping Our Brains

May 2, 2018  | By Mariana Plata

With the new wave of mindful eating, I feel like we're getting a step closer to eliminate the "diet culture" that is constantly sending us messages that our bodies aren't enough, how we need to comply with certain beauty standards, and restrict ourselves from certain meals because they affect the way we look. An important shift needs to be made in the latter: we should pay attention to the way food makes us feel, not to the way it makes us look. This is why it was so refreshing to stumble across Dr. Lisa Mosconi's new book "Brain Food: The Surprising Power of Eating for Cognitive Power"

Nature’s Bounty: Saving the Brain with Food

April 30, 2018  | By Lisa Mosconi, PhD

Researchers have long praised the Mediterranean diet for promoting brain health as well as overall physical health. In fact, as famously heart-healthy as the diet is, it also benefits the brain. A large body of scientific literature, my own work included, shows that people who closely follow a Mediterranean diet are not only less likely to develop health issues like diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease but also to have a reduced risk of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease as they age. Read my op-ed here.

A Scientist’s Guide to Eating for Brain Health

April 12, 2018

A Q&A with Dr. Lisa Mosconi. Too often, when we think about our diet, we’re thinking about how it affects our bodies, not our brains. But as Lisa Mosconi, a neuroscientist and the author of Brain Food, points out, the things we eat feed affect a lot more than what we look like. Our diet affects our minds and shapes the way we think, feel, and age. As Mosconi, the associate director of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City, tells us, “what the brain needs to eat differs from what the rest of the body needs to eat.” Read the article here

I cibi che davvero servono al tuo cervello

April 16, 2018  | By Eugenio Spagnuolo

Sappiamo quale cibo piace al nostro palato. E anche quali alimenti fanno crescere i muscoli o ci danno più energia. Ma cosa sappiamo del cibo che aiuta il nostro cervello a svolgere le sue funzioni quotidiane e gli permette di resistere all’invecchiamento e alle malattie degenerative?  Qual è il nutriente essenziale per il funzionamento del cervello? E il cibo che potrebbe prevenire l'Alzheimer? Cosa hanno in comune le diete più salutari del mondo? E, soprattutto, al cervello davvero serve lo zucchero? Read the article here.

Of All The Organs, This One Suffers Most From A Poor Diet

April 9, 2018  | By Lisa Mosconi, PhD

Of all the organs in your body, your brain is the one who suffers most from a poor diet. From its very architecture to its ability to perform, every aspect of the brain calls for proper food. Day after day, the foods we eat are broken down into nutrients, taken up into the bloodstream, and carried up into the brain. Once there, they replenish depleted storage, activate cellular reactions, and finally, become the very fabric of our brains. Consider that the next time you reach for a brownie: Its ingredients will actually become part of your brain. Read the article here.

The Food That Helps Battle Depression

April 2, 2018  | By Elizabeth Bernstein

You’re feeling depressed. What have you been eating?  Psychiatrists and therapists don’t often ask this question. But a growing body of research over the past decade shows that a healthy diet—high in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fish and unprocessed lean red meat—can prevent depression. And an unhealthy diet—high in processed and refined foods—increases the risk for the disease in everyone, including children and teens. Read my thoughts here.

A few more words on Alzheimer's prevention: Tap water? Caviar? Twinkies?

March 30, 2018  | By Robin Acbarian

Last week, I heard Mosconi speak at an event organized by former California First Lady Maria Shriver, who founded the Women's Alzheimer's Movement, which is focused on discovering why two-thirds of Alzheimer's patients are women. Mosconi has just published her first book, "Brain Food: The Surprising Science of Eating for Cognitive Power," a guide to the latest research on the links between nutrition and brain health. (This book will make caviar lovers very happy; Twinkie lovers, not so much.). Read the article here.

How to avoid losing your mind to Alzheimer's or dementia. Hint: Start now, says Maria Shriver

March 30, 2018  | By Robin Acbarian

"Research has shown that some food will help us age gracefully and keep our mental faculties intact, whereas others increase the risk of dementia substantially," said Mosconi, author of "Brain Food: The Surprising Science of Eating for Cognitive Power." "In the same way that we save for retirement," she said, "we should really start to eat for retirement." (Farewell, Snickers. It was fun while it lasted.) The brain has different dietary needs than the body. "If you eat right for your brain," Mosconi said, "you are eating right for your body, but not necessarily the other way around." Read more here.

Books That Bring Us Joy

March 26, 2018  | By Gretchen Stelter

1. Brain Food, by Lisa Mosconi, PhD

Eating for health is not a groundbreaking idea. Eating for our brain health, however, is. Mosconi’s new book covers everything from busting myths about food trends (such as why you may want some gluten after all) to a quiz about your brain health and a complete food plan. If you’re looking for help improving memory, lifting the haze of depression, or even just sharpening your cognitive edge, Brain Food will help you eat your way there.

The road to Alzheimer’s disease is lined with processed foods

March 23, 2018  | By Lisa Mosconi, PhD

Dementia haunts the United States. There’s no one without a personal story about how dementia has touched someone they care for. It’s an epidemic that’s already underway—but we don’t recognize it as such. The popular conception of Alzheimer’s is as an inevitable outcome of aging, bad genes, or both. From a scientist’s perspective, it’s important to remind everyone that we all once believed the same thing about cancer. But just a few days ago, doctors around the world have been considerably shaken up by the breaking news linking cancer to processed foods. In a large-scale study, researchers found that a 10% increase in consumption of ultra-processed foods led to a 12% increase in overall cancer events. Read the article here.

Revealed: 13 ways to prevent dementia according to a neuroscientist

March 23, 2018  | By Olivia Hartland-Robbins

Dementia and Alzheimer’s are the UK's leading cause of death, say the WHO. Around 850,000 people are now said to be living with dementia in the UK. That number is expected to grow significantly over the next several decades. But there is plenty of research to suggest small lifestyle changes could help. Neuroscientist Lisa Mosconi describes simple dietary changes you can make. Read the article here.

These Are The Best & Worst Foods For A Child's Brain

Mar 20, 2018  | By Lisa Mosconi, PhD

The Best & Worst Foods For A Child's Brain is a topic dear to my heart. The first three years of a child’s life are especially critical for brain development: during this window of time, a child figures out how to think, learn, behave, and explore, setting the stage for a fully formed set of cognitive skills.
Based on many years of neuroscience research on my part (for adults) and peer-reviewed research from my colleagues: for your child’s brain as for your own, food plays a critical role. Your little one needs the most nutrient-dense foods that you can get your hands on. Read the article here

The Healthy Woman's Guide to Eating Carbs (Which Doesn't Involve Cutting Them)

Mar 18, 2018  | By Lesley Rotchford

There's so much confusion about carbs these days. Popular eating plans like the Keto diet and Paleo diet claim that ditching them is the key to gaining muscle, losing weight, and revving energy. But active women and elite athletes are increasingly turning to plant-based diets, which are naturally higher in healthy carbs, to power their performance. So once and for all, what's the full story? Read our interesting discussion here.

The Top 5 Brain-Boosting Foods You Should Be Eating

March 12, 2018  | By Jess Cording, Women at Forbes

A well-fed brain is one of your greatest assets when it comes to your career. Creating work you’re proud of, thinking with a clear head, and communicating effectively are crucial to carving out your path and building your network. Not surprisingly, diet plays a starring role. In her new book, Brain Food: The Surprising Science of Eating for Cognitive Power (Avery/ Penguin Random House), Dr. Lisa Mosconi, PhD, INHC, Associate Director of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic at Weill Cornell Medical College, highlights the connection between diet and brain function and shares approachable, actionable tips to put that research into practice. Read the interview here.

The Best Books of 2018 (so far)

March 6, 2018  | By Nora Horvath and Elizabeth Sile

#3 Brain Food: The Surprising Science of Eating for Cognitive Power, Lisa Mosconi (Penguin Random House)

You've probably heard the phrase “you are what you eat,” but a more accurate revision might be, “You think what you eat.” In this fascinating investigation, Lisa Mosconi presents research that crosses disciplines to argue that what goes on in your brain—from your mood to your cognitive abilities—is very closely tied to what you put on your plate. In addition to being a compelling read, readers will find tips and outlines on ways they can change their diets for optimal brain health. 

A Neuroscientist Explains What Cutting Carbs Can Do to Your Brain

March 10, 2018  | By Dacy Knight

With each passing month, certain foods and fad diets come in and out of favor. One food that's been on the "bad" list for a while is bread—more specifically, gluten. Today, as many as 1 in 3 Americans avoids gluten—a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye—thereby eliminating grains and cereals from the diet. Is gluten really that bad? And what happens to your brain when you cut carbs from the diet? Read the article here.

RadioMD with Dr. Susanne

March 10, 2018

Brain function is impacted by diet. Dr. Susanne and guest Dr. Lisa Mosconi discuss how to increase cognitive performance through food on Wellness For Life Radio by RadioMD on Apple Podcasts here.  

How My Childhood in Italy Informed My Passion for Neurology and Nutrition

March 7, 2018  | By Lisa Mosconi, PhD

Like many Italians, my memories of my family and childhood are inseparable from memories of food. As a scientist, a nutritionist, and especially as a new mom, I think a lot about what makes us who we are, what shapes who we become, and the unlikely role of the kitchen at the heart of it. Read the article here.

Need a Storm Detox? Here's how to Eat Well This Week

March 9, 2018

Diet plays a key role in every aspect of brain function, shielding it from harm, says neuroscientist Dr Lisa Mosconi. So exactly what should you be eating?

Is Cutting Carbs Bad For Your Brain? A Neuroscientist Explains

March 6, 2018  | By Lisa Mosconi, PhD

Of all aspects of lifestyle, perhaps none is as important as diet. The latest research (including my own work) shows over and over that following a healthy diet is powerfully preventive against brain aging and dementia. However, there is a surprisingly wide controversy over exactly what constitutes a "healthy diet." Herein, I discuss why you shouldn't fear carbs for brain health.

Book Review: Brain Food

March 6, 2018  | By Alizah Solario

This book is as timely as it is eye-opening, in a period when life spans are increasing and awareness grows about the way brain chemistry is shaped by emotional history and environment in addition to food. That synchronicity gives this reader a bit of a rush.

This Week's Must-Read's

March 3, 2018  | By Mackenzie Dawson

Brain Food: The Surprising Science of Eating for Cognitive Power, Lisa Mosconi (nonfiction, Avery) 
If you’ve ever suspected you could be giving your brain better food for thought, this is the book to pick up. With detailed lists of foods to eat (and what to avoid) to boost cognitive function, banish “brain fog” and improve memory.

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Brain Food on Sky News

March 1, 2018

Thank you Sky News for the opportunity to talk about my book, Brain Food: How to Eat Smart and Sharpen Your Mind (Penguin Life). Can diet really change your mental capacities, and how long does it take? These are all very good questions that I was happy to address -- and only partially answer, because I'm a scientist, and scientists prefer loooooong explanations :)

 

How Menopause Increases Alzheimer's risk in Women (and What to Do to Prevent It)

January 12, 2018  | By Sergio Meda, PerAnziani.it

Beautiful piece about our research on menopause, for once in Italian. Per tutti gli amici Italiani, se vi interessa leggere perche' e come la menopausa alza il rischio di Alzheimer nelle donne (e le regole di prevenzione), lo consiglio caldamente (peranziani.it).

It's not just in the genes: the foods that can help and harm your brain

February 12, 2018  | By Lisa Mosconi, PhD

Our diet has a huge effect on our brain and our mental wellbeing, even protecting against dementia. So, what should be on the menu? Read my take on this here.

February 3, 2018   | By Lisa Mosconi, PhD

Very detailed piece about the best foods for the brain. Read the interview and an extract from my book, Brain Food, in the February 3rd edition of The Times (London).

Wellness for Life with Dr. Susanne

I had so much fun talking to Dr. Susanne Bennett about my book, Brain Food. As one of the country’s leading holistic wellness experts, Dr. Susanne has been promoting health and wellness for over 25 years. She hosts her own radio show, Wellness For Life, to share the best health strategies and provide easy to implement tips to improve your life and start feeling better today, the all-natural way. The episode is available on RadioMD.com, iHeartRadio, and TuneIn.  

How Diet and Exercise Can Reduce Alzheimer's Risk 

January 24, 2018  | By Erin Billups, NY1 News

In her report last week, Health Reporter Erin Billups explained that researchers believe menopause may be a major cause of Alzheimer's disease, which may explain why women outnumber men two to one in diagnosis. Now there's work underway aimed at lowering everyone's risk for the disease. Dr. Lisa Mosconi, featured in the related piece on Alzheimer’s about its potential link to menopause, says women in their 40s and 50s should begin eating foods rich in phytoestrogens. Watch the story here.

New study examines possible Menopause-Alzheimer's link 

January 17, 2018  | By Erin Billups, NY1 News

Recent research is confirming that Alzheimer's is actually not a disease of old age - changes in the brain leading to memory loss and other problems begins when adults hit their 40s and 50s. Now scientists may have found one cause of Alzheimer's, particularly in women. Health Reporter Erin Billups explains. Watch the story here.

How to Make Your Coffee Infinitely Healthier

December 21, 2017  | By Noah Lehava, Le Coveteur

"You probably figure your daily requisite mug of caffeine was perfect all on its glorious own. But what if we told you that with a few ~enhancements~ you can make your morning coffee a whole lot more effective? As in, brain-unlocking and de-fogging, free-radical fighting, and antioxidant-loaded benefits. With a few small tweaks to your current order and some simple additions, your coffee can become an important part of your healthy eating routine. We asked Dr. Lisa Mosconi, associate director of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic at Weill Cornell and author of BRAIN FOOD: The Surprising Science of Eating for Cognitive Power, to break down the best ways to amplify the health benefits of a cup of coffee."

Alzheimer’s and Women’s Health, an Urgent Call

Thank you Thrive Global for helping us spread the word about Alzheimer's and Women's health. It is our goal to raise awareness about this terrible disease and to help find a cure for both men and women in our lifetime. 

Recording Dr. Stieg's podcast

Delighted to be a guest on Dr. Phil Stieg's new podcast coming out January 2018. We talked about my new book, Brain Food, and all things brain.. and food. Stay tuned for more news.

Maria Shriver's "A Women's Health Summit 2017" -- Meet the Brain Experts

Truly honored to be part of Maria Shriver's "A Women's Health Summit: It Starts With the Brain" for the Women's Alzheimer's Movement. If you are a woman, or care about women, consider watching this. Thank you to Lifetime television for joining us in this fight.

Menopause can cause changes in brain linked to Alzheimer's

October 11, 2017   | By Amy Wallace, United Press International

A recent study found that menopause causes metabolic changes in the brain that can increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease in women. Alzheimer's disease affects more than 5 million Americans, including one-third of Americans over 85 years old. Women are diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease more often than men. The study, by researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine and the University of Arizona Health Sciences, was published Tuesday in Plos One.

Maria Shriver's "A Women's Health Summit: It Starts With the Brain"

Excited to be joining the panel of experts at Maria Shriver's The Women's Alzheimer's Movement Partners With Lifetime® For Enlightening "A Women's Health Summit: It Starts With the Brain" on 11/01/2017 in New York City. Are you ready?

Menopause Triggers Metabolic Brain Changes Linked to Alzheimer's

October 12, 2017  | By Megan Brooks, Medscape

"Our findings show that the loss of estrogen in menopause doesn't just diminish fertility. This study suggests there may be a critical window of opportunity, when women are in their 40s and 50s, to detect metabolic signs of higher Alzheimer's risk and apply strategies to reduce that risk," Lisa Mosconi, PhD, associate director of the Alzheimer's Prevention Clinic at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City, said in a news release. Read the article here.

Menopause triggers metabolic changes in brain that may promote Alzheimer's

October 10, 2017  Science Daily

Menopause causes metabolic changes in the brain that may increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease, a team from Weill Cornell Medicine and the University of Arizona Health Sciences has shown in new research. Read the article here.

Obstructive sleep apnea linked to higher Alzheimer's risk

November 10, 2017  | By Maria Cohut

A new study has demonstrated that older adults who experience obstructive sleep apnea may be at increased risk of Alzheimer's disease. This is because they exhibit higher levels of amyloid beta, the chief component of the amyloid plaques that characterize the disease.

DLD16: the Future of Aging. Nutritional Medicine for dementia prevention

Dr. Mosconi gives a talk at DLD16 on the role of nature (genes) versus nurture (lifestyles), and specifically on whether and, if so, how positive dietary choices can reduce the risk of dementia. Dr. Mosconi considers diet and nutrition to play a particularly important role in this.

A Conversation About Food with the Food Business School of the Culinary Institute of America

So honored to have joined the faculty at the Food Business School of the Culinary Institute of America. Tonight I'm having a conversation with William Rosenzweig, Dean of the School, about NeuroNutrition and Nutritional Medicine.

Psychology Today: No Known Expiration Date

January 10, 2016  | By Hara Hestroff Marano, Psychology Today

So impressed with Hara Hestroff Marano's take on our research in Psychology Today. Drawing on swiftly evolving insights into how the brain ages, scientists bet that memory loss can be not only delayed but, at least in its early stages, stopped in its tracks. And the critical tools turn out to be appetizingly low-tech.

You are what you eat @DLDny

So honored to join the DLD team once again, and this time in NYC. Our panel will focus on "health as an asset class", or the importance of having a healthy society around you in addition to being healthy yourself. Our goal is to bring further awareness of the relationship between food and health, and start a public discussion on the importance of proper eating for the society as a whole, not just for individuals. Come join -- or watch us later on YouTube!

Mixing Bowl 2016

Excited to be at Mixing Bowl in Manhattan, an event that looks at the application of information technology to food and agriculture. I'll be joining the panel on “Re-Do Nutrition: How is IT changing our knowledge of nutrition and helping us deliver nutrition to all?" 

Treating Sleep Apnea May Ward Off Memory Decline

April 15, 2015   | By Nicholas Bakalar

Breathing problems during sleep may be linked to early mental decline and Alzheimer’s disease, a new study suggests. But treating apnea with a continuous positive airway pressure machine can significantly delay the onset of cognitive problems. In a group of 2,470 people, average age 73, researchers gathered information on the incidence of sleep apnea, a breathing disorder marked by interrupted breathing and snoring, and the incidence of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease.

Parents with Alzheimer's may be passing abnormal brain changes to kids

February 13, 2014  | CBS News

Patients with Alzheimer's may be passing abnormalities on to their children. Learn more about our research on Alzheimer's risk and prevention. “Studies show that by the time people come in for a diagnosis, there may be a large amount of irreversible brain damage already present. This is why it is ideal that we find signs of the disease in high-risk people before symptoms occur,” study author Dr. Lisa Mosconi, a psychiatry professor at the New York University Langone Medical Center, said in a statement."

Two parents with alzheimer's disease? Disease may show up decades early on brain scans

February 12, 2014  | American Academy of Neurology

People who are dementia-free but have two parents with Alzheimer’s disease may show signs of the disease on brain scans decades before symptoms appear, according to a new study. “Studies show that by the time people come in for a diagnosis, there may be a large amount of irreversible brain damage already present,” said study author Lisa Mosconi, PhD, with the New York University School of Medicine in New York. “This is why it is ideal that we find signs of the disease in high-risk people before symptoms occur.”

2 Parents With Alzheimer's, Higher Risk of This?

February 12, 2014  | By Amy Norton, HealthDay Reporter

Our new study shows that middle-aged adults who are unfortunate enough to have both parents suffer from Alzheimer's disease may face yet another worry: an increased risk of early, Alzheimer's-related brain changes. Read the article here.

Re-Thinking Alzheimer's disease through Nutritional Medicine

Dr. Mosconi presents at the reThinkFood conference of the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) at Greystone, Napa Valley (CA). Watch her talk on 'Re-Thinking Alzheimer's disease through Nutritional Medicine' here.

Alzheimer’s Could Be Detected Decades Earlier In Children Of Sufferers

February 13, 2014   | Huffington Post

 “Studies show that by the time people come in for a diagnosis, there may be a large amount of irreversible brain damage already present,” said researcher Lisa Mosconi of the New York University School of Medicine. “This is why it is ideal that we find signs of the disease in high-risk people before symptoms occur.”

Having 2 Parents With Alzheimer's May Raise Risk of Early Brain Changes

February 12, 2014

Middle-aged adults who are unfortunate enough to have both parents suffer from Alzheimer's disease may face yet another worry: an increased risk of early, Alzheimer's-related brain changes. In a new study, researchers found that of more than 50 healthy adults, those with two parents affected by Alzheimer's were more likely to show certain abnormalities in brain scans.

Where did you get those eyes and that brain?

November 16, 2010  | by Staff reporter, Medical Daily

A family history of Alzheimer's disease significantly increases the risk for developing this disorder, but a new study in Biological Psychiatry suggests that which of your parents has the disease is very important. "Our data indicate that adult children of mothers with Alzheimer's may be at increased risk for developing the disease," explained Dr. Lisa Mosconi, the first author on the study. Dr. John Krystal, Editor of Biological Psychiatry, added: "This study is very important because we are just beginning to understand the epigenetic control of particular genes. In theory, some day, one might develop a medication that reduces the risks associated with a maternal history of Alzheimer's disease."

Reuters: Brain scans show signs of early Alzheimer's

March 15, 2010  | By Julie Steenhuysen, Reuters 

People with a family history of Alzheimer’s disease often have clumps of a toxic protein in their brains even though they are perfectly healthy, researchers said on Monday. “The hope is to one day be able to diagnose very clearly the Alzheimer’s disease process before any symptoms occur, when the brain is still healthy. Then the treatments would have the best chance of success,” said Lisa Mosconi of New York University Langone Medical Center, whose study appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. More here.

Alzheimer's risk rises if your mother was a sufferer

November 25, 2010  | By Jenny Hope, Daily Mail

The Daily Mail wrote a piece on our research on maternal history of Alzheimer's. Anyone whose mother had Alzheimer’s could be at greater risk of developing it than if their father had the disease, warn researchers. Those with a family history of Alzheimer’s are known to be at significantly higher risk of being diagnosed with the illness themselves.

Mom's Alzheimer's May Raise Kid's Risk

July 31, 2008  | CBS News

If your mother had late-onset Alzheimer's disease, you may be more likely to undergo brain metabolism changes that might lead to Alzheimer's, a new study shows. But that doesn't mean that Alzheimer's disease is definitely in your future, notes researcher Lisa Mosconi, PhD, assistant professor of psychiatry at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York. Her advice: "If you're at risk of Alzheimer's because your mother had the disease, you need to make sure that you take special care of your health" to try to prevent or delay Alzheimer's disease. Here's a look at Mosconi's findings -- presented in Chicago at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease 2008 -- and reaction from experts.

Moms With Alzheimer's May Pass on Risk to Kids

July 30, 2008  | By Steven Reinberg, HealthDay Reporter

People whose mothers have had Alzheimer's disease may be predisposed to the mind-robbing condition, a new study finds. The link may be a dysfunction in how the brain handles sugar -- something that's probably genetic and starts years before symptoms of Alzheimer's appear, researchers say. "Overall, these findings show that their brains are not working properly to start with, and the metabolic impairment gets worse over time," explained lead researcher Lisa Mosconi, a research assistant professor of psychiatry at the Center for Brain Health at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City.

PET shows potential in identifying the earliest stages of dementia

March 06, 2008  | by Charles Bankhead, MedPage Today

PET imaging with the glucose analog 18F-FDG distinguished different forms of dementia and separated them from mild cognitive impairment with greater than 90% accuracy, according to results of a multicenter trial. Automated scan interpretation recognized FDG uptake patterns specific for early-stage Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia, Lisa Mosconi, Ph.D., of New York University, and colleagues, reported in the March issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine. "The present study demonstrates the feasibility of using 18F-FDG PET in the differential diagnosis of the major neurodegenerative disorders, including mild and moderate-to-severe dementia patients, and in the characterization of [mild cognitive impairment] across multiple sites," the authors said.

Alzheimer's May Be Detected Early by Brain Scans, Studies Show

June 19, 2008

Brain scans can detect Alzheimer's disease in people who don't have symptoms, suggesting that early diagnosis may become more common for the elderly, according to studies presented at a medical conference today. The PET scan trial was the first to show that analyzing the brain's use of energy can forecast the development of the disease, said Lisa Mosconi, a research scientist at the New York University School of Medicine, who led the study. Many of the 4.5 million Americans with Alzheimer's aren't diagnosed until the disease is in an advanced stage, the Alzheimer's association said.

Study Results of 

GAMMAGARD S/D and 

GAMMAGARD LIQUID in Patients 

with Mild-to-Moderate Alzheimer's 

Disease Announced

April 17, 2008  | PRNewswire-First Call

New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center and Baxter International Inc. (NYSE: BAX) announced results of a six-month, placebo-controlled Phase II study of 24 patients treated with GAMMAGARD S/D and GAMMAGARD LIQUID [Immune Globulin Intravenous (IGIV)] for the treatment of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease today at the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) annual meeting in Chicago.

Brain Scan Technique Spots Alzheimer’s

March 26, 2008  | By Salynn Boyles, WebMD

A computer-assisted imaging technique that measures sugar metabolism within a critical area of the brain could hold the key to the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. Researchers say that the technique was accurate 94% of the time in distinguishing Alzheimer's disease from other dementias in a newly reported study published in the March issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine. "Because the incidence of (Alzheimer's and related disorders) is expected to increase dramatically as the baby boomer generation ages, accurate diagnosis is extremely important -- particularly at the early and mild stages of dementia when lifestyle changes and therapeutic interventions would be most effective," Mosconi says. Read more here.

Moms With Alzheimer's May Pass on Risk to Kids

July 30, 2007

People whose mothers have had Alzheimer's disease may be predisposed to the mind-robbing condition, a new study finds.

The link may be a dysfunction in how the brain handles sugar -- something that's probably genetic and starts years before symptoms of Alzheimer's appear, researchers say. "Overall, these findings show that their brains are not working properly to start with, and the metabolic impairment gets worse over time," explained lead researcher Lisa Mosconi, a research assistant professor of psychiatry at the Center for Brain Health at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City.

Moms With Alzheimer's May Pass on Risk to Kids -- The genetic link isn't there for fathers, research says.

July 30, 2007   | By Steven Reinberg, HealthDay Reporter

People whose mothers have had Alzheimer's disease may be predisposed to the mind-robbing condition, a new study finds. 

The link may be a dysfunction in how the brain handles sugar -- something that's probably genetic and starts years before symptoms of Alzheimer's appear, researchers say. "Overall, these findings show that their brains are not working properly to start with, and the metabolic impairment gets worse over time," explained lead researcher Lisa Mosconi, a research assistant professor of psychiatry at the Center for Brain Health at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City.

New scan predicts Alzheimer's years before symptoms - study

June 20, 2005

Scientists may soon be able to scan for Alzheimer's disease years before the onset of symptoms using a computer program that measures metabolic activity in the brain, researchers revealed here. 'This is the first demonstration that reduced metabolic activity in the hippocampus may be used to predict future Alzheimer's disease,' said Lisa Mosconi of New York University's School of Medicine, who led the research and developed the technology.

Alzheimer's risk may be cut

June 20, 2005  | By John Fauber, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Middle-aged sons and daughters of people with Alzheimer's disease may be able to reduce their risk of getting the disorder through lifestyle measures such as exercise, avoiding gum disease, moderate alcohol consumption and drinking fruit and vegetable juice, according to new research. Taken as a whole, the research suggests that even though family history may predispose a person to developing Alzheimer's, various behaviors -- if started early enough in life -- may help preserve cognitive function and delay the onset of the disease.

Scientists find early signs of Alzheimer's

June 20, 2005   | Associated Press

A subtle change in a memory-making brain region seems to predict who will get Alzheimer's disease nine years before symptoms appear, scientists reported on Sunday.

The finding is part of a wave of research aimed at early detection of the deadly dementia -- and one day perhaps even preventing it. Researchers scanned the brains of middle- aged and older people while they were still healthy. They discovered that lower energy usage in a part of the brain called the hippocampus correctly signaled who would get Alzheimer's or a related memory impairment 85 percent of the time.

Studies show ways to predict, prevent 

Alzheimer's

June 20, 2005  | ABC News

Painless brain scans and simple blood tests may offer ways to predict who has the highest risk of Alzheimer's disease, and it may be possible to lower risks by drinking juice daily, researchers said.

Key to predicting Alzheimer's?

June 20, 2005  | By Jaime Holguin, CBS/AP 

A subtle change in a memory-making brain region seems to predict who will get Alzheimer's disease nine years before symptoms appear, scientists reported. The finding is part of a wave of research aimed at early detection of the deadly dementia — and one day perhaps even  Researchers scanned the brains of middle-aged and older people while they were still healthy. They discovered that lower energy usage in a part of the brain called the hippocampus correctly signaled who would get Alzheimer's or a related memory impairment 85 percent of the time. "It's exciting that we can even talk about prevention," said William Thies, scientific director of the Alzheimer's Association. He noted that just 10 years ago there was hardly any research into that possibility.